Last edited by Macage
Wednesday, July 22, 2020 | History

5 edition of Plague and the poor in Renaissance Florence found in the catalog.

Plague and the poor in Renaissance Florence

Ann G. Carmichael

Plague and the poor in Renaissance Florence

by Ann G. Carmichael

  • 120 Want to read
  • 14 Currently reading

Published by Cambridge University Press in Cambridge [Cambridgeshire], New York .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Florence (Italy),
  • Italy,
  • Florence,
  • Florence.
    • Subjects:
    • Plague -- Italy -- Florence -- History.,
    • Renaissance -- Italy -- Florence.,
    • Poor -- Italy -- Florence.,
    • Florence (Italy) -- History -- To 1421.

    • Edition Notes

      StatementAnn G. Carmichael.
      SeriesCambridge history of medicine
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsRC172 .C37 1986
      The Physical Object
      Paginationxv, 180 p. :
      Number of Pages180
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL2536611M
      ISBN 100521268338
      LC Control Number85017451

        Developed throughout early modern Europe, lazaretti, or plague hospitals, took on a central role in early modern responses to epidemic disease, in particular the prevention and treatment of plague. The lazaretti served as isolation hospitals, quarantine centres, convalescent homes, cemeteries, and depots for the disinfection or destruction of infected goods. Full text Full text is available as a scanned copy of the original print version. Get a printable copy (PDF file) of the complete article (K), or click on a page image below to browse page by page.

        In Florence Under Siege: Surviving Plague in an Early Modern City, John Henderson examines how a major European city suffered, resisted and survived plague. This book provides a nuanced and compassionate interpretation of government policies in practice, going beyond traditional oppositions between rich and poor, by recreating the personal. This study aims to enrich the literature by studying how accounting systems were used in the management of the plague by a charity organisation – the Confraternita of Misericordia – during the first decades of the Renaissance in Florence, focusing on the role of the partnership between the Republic of Florence and the Misericordia.

      Historians and Plague in Italy. Plague in Florence: Themes and sources. Part I Florence Under Siege: Coping with Plague. 2 The Invasion of Plague in Early Modern Italy Plague Approaches Florence: Border controls and cordons sanitaires. Plague on the Outskirts of Florence, Summer Plague Mortality in the City, S T E F A N O C A R O T I ANN G. CARMICHAEL, Plague and the poor in Renaissance Florence, Cambridge- London-New York-New Rochelle-Melbourne-Sidney, Cambridge University Press («Cambridge History of Medicine », eds. Charles Wabster and Charles Rosemberg), pp., bibl., ind. S T E F A N O C A R O T I SECOLI XVI-XX A. RUPERT HALL, La rivoluzione nella scienza. , .


Share this book
You might also like
The 2000 Import and Export Market for Live Bovines and Buffaloes in Ecuador (World Trade Report)

The 2000 Import and Export Market for Live Bovines and Buffaloes in Ecuador (World Trade Report)

Operation - volunteers

Operation - volunteers

Salmons Journey

Salmons Journey

Scholastic preparedness

Scholastic preparedness

Our street.

Our street.

Marxism and history

Marxism and history

The family

The family

Brazil

Brazil

Regional Workshop on Biological Control (Noumea, New Caledonia, 6-10 August 1979)

Regional Workshop on Biological Control (Noumea, New Caledonia, 6-10 August 1979)

Zanzibar national prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV

Zanzibar national prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV

Information technology and economic prospects.

Information technology and economic prospects.

Plague and the poor in Renaissance Florence by Ann G. Carmichael Download PDF EPUB FB2

This item: Plague and the Poor in Renaissance Florence (Cambridge Studies in the History of Medicine) by Ann G. Carmichael Paperback $ Available to ship in days. Ships from and sold by by: Plague and the poor in Renaissance Florence.

Plague And The Poor In Renaissance Florence book. Read reviews from world’s largest community for readers. Originally published inthis book uses F /5. Plague and the poor in Renaissance Florence. [Ann G Carmichael] Home. WorldCat Home About WorldCat Help.

Search. Search for Library Items Search for Lists Search for this book uses Florentine death registers to show the changing character of plague from the first outbreak of the Black Death in to the mid-fifteenth century.

Carmichael, Ann G. Plague and the poor in Renaissance Florence / Ann G. Carmichael Cambridge University Press Cambridge [Cambridgeshire] ; New York Wikipedia Citation Please see Wikipedia's template documentation for further citation fields that may be required. NYU Florence Acton Lecture Death in Florence: Plague, Prosecution, and the Poor in early Modern Florence A lecture by John Henderson, University of London, Birkbeck.

Plague remains a. The birthplace of the European Renaissance was one of the most devastated regions. The last assault by the plague occurred inafter which the plague disappeared from Tuscany.

Figure 2. Part A: Florence price index, ; Part B: Daily real wage rates of masons,   Before the plague ofFlorence had begun opening the city to gente nuove, non-aristocrats who relied on business for their fortunes rather than inherited agricultural holdings or.

In Florence Under Siege, John Henderson examines how a major city fought, suffered and survived the impact of plague. Going beyond traditional oppositions between rich and poor, this book provides a nuanced and more compassionate interpretation of government policies in practice, by recreating the very human reactions and survival strategies of families and individuals at all levels of.

Hence isolation hospitals, quarantine and health boards: plague control was social control. Stated so baldly, the theory is hardly novel.

What is new is the subtle epidemiology adduced in its support. Dr Carmichael analyses the causes of death listed during epidemics by the Florentine Grain Office and the Physicians' Guild in their Books of the.

Florence Under Siege: Surviving Plague in an Early Modern City, by John Henderson, is a fascinating book, not least for its chapter on how the Church in Florence handled the plague of Plague and the Poor in Renaissance Florence.

(Cam-bridge History of Medicine.) Cambridge-New York: Cambridge University Press, xvi + i8o pp. $ This book is a study of the perception and experience of plague-or what passed as plague-in fourteenth- and fifteenth-century Flor.

In its February 20 issue, the London Review of Books reviewed Florence Under Siege: Surviving Plague in An Early Modern City by John Henderson. The reviewer, Erin Maglaque, observed that not only. She then shows how the differences in the plague reshaped the attitudes of Italian city-dwellers toward plague in the fifteenth century.

This book will be of value to anyone with an interest in the history of the plague, Renaissance Italy and the history of dge Studies in the History of Medicine: Plague and the Poor in. Plague and the Poor in Renaissance Florence. book that illuminates the lives and attitudes of peasants in preindustrial Europe, Piero Camporesi makes the unexpected and fascinating claim that.

Death in Florence: Plague, Prosecution, and the Poor in Early Modern Florence John Henderson is Professor of Italian Renaissance History in the Department of History, Classics and Archaeology, Birkbeck, University of London; and Research Professor at Monash University, Melbourne.

He has published a wide range of books and articles in the. The poor were the lowly organs that attracted and even bred disease: ‘If the disease is in the city, they receive it and retain it, as if they were the glands of society.’ In Righi’s opinion, the plague in Florence didn’t enter the city from beyond its walls, but swelled and gathered virulence in the bodies of the poor.

The University of Chicago Press. Books Division. Chicago Distribution Center. “ Plague and Perceptions of the Poor in Early Modern Italy.” In Epidemics and Ideas.

Essays on the Historical Perception of Pestilence, edited by Ranger, Terence and Slack, Paul, –   The physician and medical historian Ann Carmichael, in Plague and the Poor in Renaissance Florence (), has argued that the epidemics that hit Florence in the fifteenth century were actually bubonic plague mixed with other diseases.

Guided in part by this insight, A. Lynn Martin turns to a hitherto completely neglected source for the history. This book explores Florence’s response to the Plague of The disease killed roughly 12% of Florence’s population over the course of this year. Remarkably, though, as deadly as this sounds, it was actually a testament to the measures the city took to mitigate the worse effects of the pandemic, as the outcome was far more brutal in other Reviews: 2.

PANDEMICS Florence Under Seige: Surviving Plague in an Early Modern City John Henderson Yale, $ In the summer of the committee for public health in Florence. For Renaissance Italians, combating black plague was as much about politics as it was science, according to Stanford scholar.

The inability of 14th-century medicine to stop the plague.